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Alex Ch

N=1:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina's_World
N=2:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drawing_Hands
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Gothic
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Gustav_Klimt_016.jpg
N=4:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nighthawks
N=5:
http://arthistory.about.com/od/from_exhibitions/ig/from_russia_1207/fr04_matisse.htm
http://painting.about.com/od/arthistorytrivia/ig/Gallery-of-Famous-Paintings/Picasso-Demoiselles.htm
N=7??:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:PicassoGuernica.jpg
N=7:
http://www.dogsplayingpoker.org/gallery/coolidge/a_friend_in_need.html
N=9:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomy_Lesson_of_Dr._Nicolaes_Tulp
N=12-15:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luncheon_of_the_Boating_Party

By the way, you have accidentally reinvented a parlor game from the turn of the last century: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tableau_vivant
"Tableau vivant (plural: tableaux vivants) is French for "living picture." The term describes a striking group of suitably costumed actors or artist's models, carefully posed and often theatrically lit. Throughout the duration of the display, the people shown do not speak or move."

The way I heard it, during a party, one person would be selected to leave the room; while he or she was absent, the remaining people would create a tableau vivant and then the "it" person would have to come back in the room and guess the original work. Sort of like Charades or Pictionary but for people whose shared cultural education included many famous paintings.

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